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DR-CAFTA: challenges and opportunities for Central America (English)

This report provides a preliminary assessment of DR-CAFTA, the free trade agreement negotiated by Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic (DR), El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, with the U.S.; with particular attention to three key themes: (i) expected trade and non-trade benefits, (ii) actions that Central American countries need to pursue to capitalize optimally on the new opportunities, and (iii) identification of the population groups that may require assistance to adapt to a more competitive environment. The report focuses on the developing countries of Central America, namely Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.

Details

  • Document Date

    2005/01/01

  • Document Type

    Working Paper

  • Report Number

    32953

  • Volume No

    1

  • Total Volume(s)

    1

  • Country

    Central America,

  • Region

    Latin America & Caribbean,

  • Disclosure Date

    2010/07/01

  • Disclosure Status

    Disclosed

  • Doc Name

    DR-CAFTA: challenges and opportunities for Central America

  • Keywords

    removal of trade barriers;macroeconomic policy implications;representative household survey data;access to service markets;sanitary and phytosanitary standards;improvements in expenditure efficiency;intellectual property right law;efficiency of government programs;Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures;free trade agreement;business cycle synchronization;areas of trade;intellectual property rights;Trade Policies;Trade Policy;technical assistance program;regional integration effort;rules of origin;trade and growth;bilateral trade agreement;agricultural commodity;impacts on agriculture;preferential market access;innovation and growth;Poverty & Inequality;import of poultry;trade in services;regional trade integration;trade and investment;living in poverty;civil society stakeholders;quality of public;poor rural household;unilateral trade reforms;relative producer prices;direct fiscal subsidy;development of infrastructure;foreign investment flow;expansion of export;privatization of infrastructure;public-private partnership;public private partnership;average tariff level;macroeconomic policy coordination;double taxation treaty;growth in trade;tax revenue ratio;area of infrastructure;rural financial service;machinery and equipment;incentive for farmer;regional economic agenda;macroeconomic policy issue;degree of independence;public sector agency;conditional cash transfer;income support payment;improved working condition;expansion of trade;pattern of development;investments in education;removal of barrier;barriers to trade;bundle of goods;trade restriction;International Trade;trade diversification;trade structure;fiscal response;vulnerable group;agricultural product;trade preference;macro policies;macro policy;dynamic gains;trade flow;agricultural crop;domestic reform;static gains;fiscal loss;regulatory environment;international transport;dairy product;poor household;economic reform;income opportunity;empirical study;consumption side;fiscal incentive;unilateral liberalization;public good;integration initiative;private finance;static analysis;grace period;trade intensity;Public Goods;exchange control;poultry meat;policy option;import tax;trading partner;institutional strengthening;common tariff;export product;trade levels;macroeconomic implication;production diversification;price change;road quality;capital good;innovation policy;regulatory change;Innovation Policies;customs administration;preferential rate;insurance market;significant challenge;affected population;domestic legislation;export volume;export sector;high wage;aggregate growth;trade opportunity;operational efficiency;legislative change;improving infrastructure;local economy;apparel export;traditional commodity;information exchange;road density;international competition;customs efficiency;financial depth;shipping cost;governance challenge;public resource;apparel industry;targeted transfer;preferential treatment;unilateral preferences;improving customs;complementary factor;fiscal consolidation;import regime;empirical analysis;quantitative restriction;technical standard;raw material;integration policy;free importation;feed grain;import permit;short period;transaction cost;dynamic effect;global commitment;financial supervision;regional market;Labor Market;social return;poverty outcome;macroeconomic result;trade volume;textile product;Financial Sector;improving growth;complementary policies;foreign investor;private initiative;tax enforcement;household data;simulation result;dynamic process;financial asset;goods market;welfare gains;trade protection;quota barriers;bovine meat;domestic investment;reform effort;government regulation;relative price;competitive environment;rural area;household welfare;removing barriers;white maize;policy priority;welfare impact;labor regulation;firm entry;econometric challenge;adjustment period;tariff reduction;eliminating tariffs;targeted program;put pressure;unilateral efforts;innovation effort;remove trade;export growth;administrative corruption

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Citation

DR-CAFTA: challenges and opportunities for Central America (English). Washington, D.C. : World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/249751468212969403/DR-CAFTA-challenges-and-opportunities-for-Central-America