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Agricultural extension : good intentions and hard realities (English)

This article provides a framework outlining farmers demand for information, the public goods character of extensions services, and the organizational and the political attributes affecting the performance of extension systems. This conceptual framework is used to analyze several extensions modalities and their likely and actual effectiveness. The analysis highlights the efficiency gains that can come from locally decentralized delivery system with incentive structures based on largely private provision, although in poorer countries extension services will remain funded. The goals of agricultural extension includes transferring information from the global knowledge base and from local research to farmers, enabling them to clarify their own goals and possibilities, educating them on how to make better decisions, and stimulating desirable agricultural development.

Details

  • Author

    Anderson,Jock R., Feder,Gershon

  • Document Date

    2004/12/01

  • Document Type

    Journal Article

  • Report Number

    76475

  • Volume No

    1

  • Total Volume(s)

    1

  • Country

    World,

  • Region

    The World Region,

  • Disclosure Date

    2013/04/09

  • Disclosure Status

    Disclosed

  • Doc Name

    Agricultural extension : good intentions and hard realities

  • Keywords

    wageningen agricultural university;agricultural research and extension system;extension service;Internal rate of return;fee for service system;marginal rate of return;national agricultural research institute;international rice research institute;total factor productivity analysis;high rates of illiteracy;farmer;farmer field school;public extension service;Integrated Pest Management;rates of return;ipm program;economies of scale;investment in research;contracted extension service;ex post evaluation;crop management practice;international development agency;return to investment;lack of accountability;diffusion of knowledge;supply of service;public sector financing;diffusion of information;political economy implication;terms of trade;rural infrastructure investment;common grazing land;global knowledge base;public sector finance;information delivery systems;private sector funding;public sector hierarchy;impact on farmer;private sector market;private service delivery;agricultural extension service;production of knowledge;impact on yield;crop management technology;lack of commitment;business development service;senior government official;adoption of technology;international food policy;quality of data;cooperative extension service;overseas development institute;research observer;public good;financial sustainability;Public Goods;political commitment;knowledge generation;poor farming;extension operation;public funding;conceptual framework;Fiscal Sustainability;extension activity;extension work;political support;private provision;field operations;panel data;extension education;incentive structure;institutional innovation;rural extension;Advisory services;trained farmer;econometric approach;productivity change;international case;input indicator;e-mail address;information dissemination;national centre;university press;input supply;production function;efficiency gain;commercial farmer;sustainable forestry;extension agency;research priority;geographical area;supervisory staff;research system;field staff;private good;cultural change;extension program;donor funding;resource economics;market failure;econometric study;irrigation system;resource constraint;external fund;organization theory;reference manual;institutional climate;cost-benefit analysis;food safety;complementary policies;participatory approach;statistical method;data availability;econometric method;marginal product;weather variables;pesticide regulation;nutrient status;input data;price incentive;marketing channel;soil erosion;technical department;analytical tool;investment operation;econometric analysis;national system;organizational form;extension personnel;financial stress;public provision;staff morale;information products;finance provision;suitable extension;international symposium;sustainable practices;information provision;agrarian policy;Basic Education;voluntary institutions;data quality;methodological issue;unsustainable training;guiding principles;crop productivity;market good;complementary factor;input market;beneficiary level;membership fee;political level;Moving Service;positive feedback;local agency;political leadership;political interference;election campaign;farmer association;farmers' association;weak accountability;government funding;private entity;non-governmental organization;fiscal burden;public support;extension policy;gradual withdrawal;regulatory duty;performance criteria;loan application;statistical reports;monetary incentive;private research;economic sector;public policy;double cropping;transport cost;public servant;rural community;irrigation investment;university system;cash value;management structure;scientific community;public research;large portfolio;farming system;medium-size enterprise;positive outcome;farm level;budget allocation;farm productivity;credit constraint;public-private partnership;public responsibility;local research;human capital;information flow;rural welfare;fertilizer use;timely access;productive efficiency;agricultural sector

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Citation

Anderson,Jock R. Feder,Gershon

Agricultural extension : good intentions and hard realities (English). Washington, D.C. : World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/473431468320670648/Agricultural-extension-good-intentions-and-hard-realities