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Health worker preferences for job attributes in Ethiopia : results from a discrete choice experiment (English)

This paper estimates the effectiveness of a range of policy interventions aimed at improving the supply of health workers to rural areas in Ethiopia. Using data from a survey of 861 health workers, it employs stated preference techniques to predict labor market responses of doctors and nurses to changes in rural wages, working conditions, housing benefits, and training opportunities. Doubling wages in areas outside the capital will increase the share of doctors willing to work there from about 7 percent to more than 50 percent. Providing high quality housing would increase physician labor supply to about 27 percent, which is equivalent to paying a wage bonus of about 46 percent. Doubling wages paid to nurses for work in rural areas outside cities increases their labor supply from 4 percent to 27 percent, while the non-wage attribute that is most effective in inducing them to relocate to rural areas is the quality of equipment and drugs. The same impact could be achieved by increasing rural nursing wages by about 57 percent for men and 69 percent for women.

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Citation

Hanson, Kara Jack,William G.

Health worker preferences for job attributes in Ethiopia : results from a discrete choice experiment (English). Washington, D.C. : World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/716191468030240068/Health-worker-preferences-for-job-attributes-in-Ethiopia-results-from-a-discrete-choice-experiment