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Financing higher education in Africa : Makerere, the quiet revolution (English)

This report is one of a series that examines the state of higher education in a variety of countries in Africa at the end of the twentieth century. This one tells the dramatic story oh how Makerere University in Uganda has addressed the pervasive problem of how to provide quality education at the tertiary level without undue financial dependence upon the state. It describes the main reform measures adopted, assesses their impact, considers some of the reasons for the success of chosen measures, identifies remaining issues for attention and looks at the question of sustainability.

Details

  • Author

    Court, David

  • Document Date

    1999/04/30

  • Document Type

    Working Paper (Numbered Series)

  • Report Number

    22883

  • Volume No

    1

  • Total Volume(s)

    1

  • Country

    Uganda,

  • Region

    Africa,

  • Disclosure Date

    2010/07/01

  • Doc Name

    Financing higher education in Africa : Makerere, the quiet revolution

  • Keywords

    local government reform;privatization of public enterprise;Higher Education;quality of teaching;source of revenue;staff salary supplementation;college of agriculture;supply of electricity;efforts of governments;Ethics and Integrity;higher educational institution;universal primary education;tertiary education sector;international higher education;teaching and management;quality secondary school;effect of privatization;quality of learning;availability of fund;representatives from business;process of reform;per capita cost;provision of equipment;benefits of privatization;foreign exchange liberalization;expansion of enrolment;financial sector reform;cost of education;process of negotiation;account of development;quality higher education;quality tertiary education;equity of access;faculty of law;sense of ownership;limited liability company;tertiary level;private university;research output;management structure;alternative financing;public funding;political stability;reform process;academic development;semester system;financial reform;university leadership;resource constraint;external efficiency;evening class;student body;evening course;external environment;administrative decentralization;bachelor degree;legal framework;macro economic;disposable income;academic staff;mission statement;private resources;needy student;recurrent revenue;economic reform;participatory management;market demand;staff morale;building resource;income generation;faculty salary;african universities;private source;library enrichment;institutional factor;academic quality;financial dependence;state funding;student enrollment;university autonomy;employment opportunities;employment opportunity;market orientation;Social Sciences;tertiary institution;female participation;financial resource;financial base;academic infrastructure;institutional context;enrollment expansion;public good;student intake;managerial reform;institutional change;data requirement;institutional performance;administrative staff;institutional research;academic curriculum;educational sector;knowledge creation;radical change;state finance;academic institution;staff remuneration;incentive structure;public subsidy;running cost;incentive scheme;university development;limited resources;educational qualification;university management;operational autonomy;community collaboration;block grant;veterinary medicine;natural science;allocation of government funding;female faculty;faculty development;physical facility;commercial source;research planning;contextual factor;financial future;political commitment;regulatory system;procedural framework;relative performance;academic support;institutional autonomy;integrated management;regional collaboration;internal change;quality education;external examiner;permanent job;short supply;personnel policy;comparative performance;professional institution;educational quality;computer access;living wage;incentive system;research funding;graduate program;academic reputation;market force;strategic investment;mass education;national educational;social background;consultative meeting;university community;tracer study;university partnership;financial committee;accreditation procedure;legal measure;tertiary sector;academic improvement;financial authority;equitable access;financial constraint;capacity loss;administrative rationalization;research exercise;Institutional data;real income;entrepreneurial activity;export marketing;import liberalization;Basic Education;support faculty;public resource;national university;examination performance;tertiary system;private management;print shop;secondary level;organizational development;parliamentary election;mutual trust;raise funds;public university;university level;male student;degree course;academic faculty;sole provider;internal governance;public health;oversight body;political change;national service;university curriculum;university student;state subsidy;access requirement;comparative advantage;public support;cross subsidization

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Citation

Court, David

Financing higher education in Africa : Makerere, the quiet revolution (English). Washington, D.C. : World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/759471468760210734/Financing-higher-education-in-Africa-Makerere-the-quiet-revolution